Set Goals

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:54

FUNdamentals

This page is based on the LTAD.ca website, the Irish LTPD, the RFU LTAD Booklet and our implementation for the Dutch Rugby Union: Meerjaren Opleidingsplan Rugby (MOR). You can download related pdf documents on the Free Download section of my website.

Players in this category are approximately 5 - 10 years old.

LTPD quote: [The FUNdamental stage has to be well structured and fun! Participation in as many sports as possible is encouraged - if possible three or four times per week. This is where we develop the overall motor skills. Most learning activities are best promoted by playing. This theme does not just apply to modified games but also to reduced exercises and drill activities. Specific techniques and corrections can be integrated throughout the activity while still maintaining maximum participation and enjoyment]

This will also ensure that players receive a positive and motivating experience, remember experiencing individual success drives further learning!

The Rugby Guide

We call the coach for this development phase the Rugby Guide. He recognizes that children are not small adults. The LTPD Definition: the Rugby Guide facilitates the needs and capacities of younger players, providing the environment for players to explore in a safe and exciting way. Corrections and guidance should be subtle and simple, dealing with issues in a broad rather than detailed perspective.

The Rugby Guide is involved in the next activities:

  • KSS 2.1: Prepare for and delivering training sessions for his team
  • KSS 2.2: Managing the team at games & tournaments
  • Make rugby safe: injury prevention

I have set up lots of pages to help the Rugby Guide with these tasks. Also you will find a whole archive of documents to help you on your way in a practical manner.

FUNdamentals and the Rugby Guide

Children in this age are very egoistic. You want to get them to play together? Only possible is a very special way. French rugby has developed a nice model that split children into three categories: those who always want to ball and go forward, those who are always near and around the ball and those waiting for the ball to come to them. By categorizing them in this way you understand how play can develop.

Most importantly: let them discover space! Get the ball and run into space, even if this is in our understanding running away from your support. As a National Under 18 coach I found that a lot of my players had little understanding of space, it took considerable time to develop it.

LTPD Rugby Guide, Coaching Course

Finally, I have set up a special coaching course for The Rugby Guide alone, it takes you five workshops to become one. A Self Study DVD and a Rugby Guide Coaching Manual are part of this course. Offering more information and giving you the confidence to succesfully work with youngsters. IRB Level I is a nice one-day intro but forget IRB Level II, yes, you learn about rugby it does nothing to help you to become the Rugby Guide. IRB Level I and II do not address the specific differences in children and adults. And you are still left with questions how to make a plan for the season, what your tactical and technical goals are. Strange when you come to think of it, now we have a development model for our players, the development model of the coach does not reflect this.....

Relevant topics:

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:54

Training To Train

This page is based on the LTAD.ca website, the Irish LTPD, the RFU LTAD Booklet and our implementation for the Dutch Rugby Union: Meerjaren Opleidingsplan Rugby (MOR). You can download related pdf documents on the Free Download section of my website.

Players are typically 15 to 17 years old.

Quote the LTPD: [Young players are introduced to the basic tactical and technical skills along with ancillary capacities including warm up and cool down, stretching, hydration and nutrition, recovery and regeneration, mental preparation, taper and peak, integrated pre-competition routines and post-competition recovery.]

The major focus of training is on learning the basics as opposed to competing. Having laid the tactical foundation in the earlier LTAD stages, the development of general rugby player is an ongoing project in this phase. It is exciting to see how players are developing after their growth spurt. This is also the phase where we can begin to get a better understanding what are suitable positions for the individual players!

The Rugby Challenger

Quote LTPD: [Given the greater capacities of players, the requirement for the coach is to go beyond teaching and to challenge players to become more proficient and achieve higher standards of performance. Therefore the coach extracts a higher level of performance through appropriate challenges and application of pressure.]

It is an interesting phase in the development of players, success is improving yourself. Performance profiling the measuring stick.

The Rugby Challenger is involved in these activities:

  • KSS 3.1: Prepare for and deliver training sessions for his team
  • KSS 3.2: Coach the team at games & tournaments
  • KSS 3.3: Organise activities
  • Make rugby safe: injury prevention
  • Built a team

This an exciting age group. The players understand the basics of rugby, re-starts can now become a platform to launch an attack rather than just a way to introduce the ball into open play. Rucks and Mauls can be created deliberate.

How to present rugby to this age group? Now you can involve them into their learning process.

I have set up lots of pages to help the Rugby Challenger with these tasks. Also you will find a whole archive of documents to help you on your way in a practical manner.

LTPD Rugby Challenger Coaching Course·

Finally, I have set up a special coaching course for The Rugby Challenger alone, it takes you five workshops to become one. A Self Study DVD and a Rugby Challenger Coaching Manual are part of this course. Offering more information and giving you the confidence to succesfully work with youngsters. IRB Level I is a nice one-day intro but forget IRB Level II, yes, you learn about rugby it does nothing to help you to become the Rugby Challenger. You are still left with questions how to make a plan for the season, what your tactical and technical goals are. Strange when you come to think of it, now we have a development model for our players, the development model of the coach does not reflect this.....

Relevant topics

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:54

LTAD: Training To Compete for Rugby (T2C)

This page is based on the LTAD.ca website, the Irish LTPD, the RFU LTAD Booklet and our implementation for the Dutch Rugby Union: Meerjaren Opleidingsplan Rugby (MOR). You can download related pdf documents on the Free Download section of my website.

Players in this category are 17/18 and older.

Now we can have a better understanding of the players physical development we can start optimizing their potential and develop rugby positional and unit skills.

Quote LTP: [Players who are now proficient at performing both basic ad rugby specific skills learn to perform these skills under a variety of competitive conditions during training. The emphasis is now on individual preparation which addresses each athlete's individual strengths and weaknesses]

In the Netherlands we believe that tactical development is the first priority and is done in the earlier LTAD stages. This phase of the LTAD model we can detail positional requirements like restarts, counter attack, collective defensive patterns and more. Remember to work from the tactical context.

The Rugby Facilitator

Since the characteristics of players are such that they have the capacity for greater input, the role of the coach shifts towards facilitation. Allowing opportunity for opinions and problem-solving is critical if players are to develop confidence and relative autonomy.

The coach will still need to employ guiding, teaching and challenging skills where appropriate, the emphasis should be on developing players’ ability to ‘navigate’ rather than ‘replicate’.

This fits well with the Adaptive Game where we want our players to play to the defense that is in front of them. Opposing to the Planned Game where the coach suddenly needs to organise an enormous pile of things.

The Rugby Facilitator is involved in the next activities:

  • KSS 2.1: Prepare for and delivering training sessions for his team
  • KSS 2.2: Managing the team at games & tournaments
  • Make rugby safe: injury prevention

LTPD Rugby Facilitator Coaching Course

Finally, I have set up a special coaching course for The Rugby Facilitator alone, it takes you five workshops to become one. A Study DVD and a Rugby Facilitator Coaching Manual are part of this course. Offering more information and giving you the confidence to succesfully work with youngsters. Forget IRB Level I and II it does nothing to help you to become the Rugby Facilitator. (Strange when you come to think of it, now we have a development model for our players, the development model of the coach does not reflect this.....)

Relevant topics:

   

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:54

Training to Win (T2W)

This page is based on the LTAD.ca website, the Irish LTPD, the RFU LTAD Booklet and our implementation for the Dutch Rugby Union: Meerjaren Opleidingsplan Rugby (MOR). You can download related pdf documents on the Free Download section of my website.

This phase is typically for players 21+ years old. Our NOC calls them Senioren & Senioren-1.

Quote LTPD: [All of the athlete’s physical, technical, tactical, mental, and ancillary capacities are now fully established. The focus of training has shifted to the optimization of performance.
Athletes are trained to peak for major competitions]

The Rugby Empowerer

Quote the LTPD: [The principles of adult learning together with the characteristics of champion athletes imply that coaches must release rather than restrict the potential of the players and other coaching staff, otherwise the potential for creativity and responsibility will be stifled. With player accountability comes player responsibility and relevant player control. For this to occur the coach must create an environment where trust and respect between all squad members is established while still maintaining ultimate responsibility for team performance and results.]

The Rugby Empowerer is involved in the next activities:

  • KSS 2.1: Prepare for and delivering training sessions for his team
  • KSS 2.2: Managing the team at games & tournaments
  • Make rugby safe: injury prevention

I have set up lots of pages to help the Rugby Empowerer with these tasks. Also you will find a whole archive of documents to help you on your way in a practical manner. 

Relevant topics:

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:55

Recruit, Retain, Retrain, Throughout Life

This page is based on the LTAD.ca website, the Irish LTPD, the RFU LTAD Booklet and our implementation for the Dutch Rugby Union: Meerjaren Opleidingsplan Rugby (MOR). You can download related pdf documents on the Free Download section of my website.

What to do if your playing career is over? Mine was pretty short, I picked up an achilles tendon injury and never recovered. Part of the recovery plan was to train and coach an under 16 team to stay involved with rugby. At 25 I decided to make coaching my next step in rugby.

With the 'Active for Life' phase in the LTAD model I am much more aware on the recruitment side of things. Players who have a fading interest in playing I now approach and involve in training and video evaluation. I find that those players are happy to stay involved on another level. Taking up a team on your own is a big step!

Relevant topics:

   

More Articles...

Page 2 of 3

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 Next > End >>