Evaluate

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 16:46

The focus of the coaching staff of this selection was to create an climate where young and promising players could grow into a mature athlete for the National team. For most of the players it was a time for serious decision making: pursue a career as a top rugby player or not? Testing players fitness fitted in nicely in this philosophy.

The program was divided in several sections:

  • Strength tests using a multi gym, sargent jump
  • Body Composition using skin fold, height / weight measurements, stretch-and-reach mobility test
  • Anaerobic endurance test: shuttle run (also know as beep test or multistage fitness test)

These test were performed at Papendal, the Dutch National Sports center at the following times:

  • End of September (normal club season in fourth week)
  • Around Christmas
  • March (we used to have internationals in April / May)

Test would be performed at Friday evening, the beep test or shuttle run test indoors and the players would get an evaluation after Saturdays lunch. (Saturday we would do unit and team skills). Saturday afternoon players would leave for home with a copy of their test results (including previous results). I developed a database for this.

An interesting correlation exists between the shuttle run tests and the fat percentage of a player. This way we could prove the players that minding what you eat can improve your ability as a player. (My database would generate these and graphs). The result was that players improved on their diet.

Interesting results were players changing their diet, picking up weight training schedules, comparing their results amongst each other and setting a standard (norming). I think a good example was the growing popularity of the banana the fast food version of fruit.

Fitness training became an essential element of the Under 21 Selection.

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 16:42

 

Frequently Asked Questions: Beeptest

 Some questions useres (or would be users) have asked us in the past...

1. I am running Windows Vista and have no access to the help page, is there any way I can see a copy of this?

Let us know, we will email a pdf document, covers all the team beeptest usage & functions .

2. When I select save results, where are they saved?

Into the players.txt file, same directory as your team beeptest exe file.

3. How do I see the results in table format rather than just the graph?

The players.txt can be viewed in any text editor, or word processing (which can convert to a table). Martin of rugbycoach converts the players.txt to excel but cannot see any real advantage unless excel is already being used.

4. How can I run this for several teams? I've tried to add a team but all it did was cancel out the first team results.

Just copy the whole beeptest directory to another name i.e.. xyzU18BeepTest, TeamBBeepTest any name and as many teams as you need. The whole application and associated files only come upto around 1Mb so your not using much disk space, then you can have separate players.txt files (upto 25 players) for each team.

5. Is putting the weight of each player in relevant?

Yes/No, I used to show that the percentage body fat correlates very well with beeptest scores! It motivated my front row to loose some weight. But it is of no influence on how the software records scores.

6. Can I use the software for the 30-15 IFT test?

There are some coaches using the 30-15 IFT test on our team beeptest software, have just dug out the papers to remind myself of the details, please let me know if you are interested in these documents....

The major change is pushing out the lap distance to 40m, and bringing down the activity time to 30 seconds with a 15 second rest, giving a 45 second overall stage time. The strange part is that the stages do not complete at the 40m markers, this makes testing awkward.

Please have a look at the a standard beeptest script in full below, this is not usually seen in this form as the beeptest software does not need a script for the standard beeptest. In this case it's a very useful starting point for the 30-15 IFT script. Basically the stages are half the number of laps (ie. from 60s to 30s of activity) with a 15s rest after each stage.

See below for a 30-15 IFT draft script file developed by & sent out to other coaches.
The lap distance is set at 20m to get the beep at the mid point. Text files sometimes get messed up by the email system, check they look correct (have pasted the 30-15 IFT below as a reference), before copying to your beeptest folder.

repeat 6 run 4 rest 15
repeat 3 run 5 rest 15
repeat 4 run 6 rest 15
repeat 8 run 7 rest 15

 

LapDistance=20

 

Stage1Speed = 8.0
Stage2Speed = 8.5
Stage3Speed = 9
Stage4Speed = 9.5
Stage5Speed = 10
Stage6Speed = 10.5
Stage7Speed = 11
Stage8Speed = 11.5
Stage9Speed = 12
Stage10Speed = 12.5
Stage11Speed = 13
Stage12Speed = 13.5
Stage13Speed = 14
Stage14Speed = 14.5
Stage15Speed = 15
Stage16Speed = 15.5
Stage17Speed = 16
Stage18Speed = 16.5
Stage19Speed = 17
Stage20Speed = 17.5
Stage21Speed = 18

 

Stage1Laps= 4
Stage2Laps= 4
Stage3Laps= 4
Stage4Laps= 4
Stage5Laps= 4
Stage6Laps= 4
Stage7Laps= 5
Stage8Laps= 5
Stage9Laps= 5
Stage10Laps= 6
Stage11Laps= 6
Stage12Laps= 6
Stage13Laps= 6
Stage14Laps= 7
Stage15Laps= 7
Stage16Laps= 7
Stage17Laps= 7
Stage18Laps= 7
Stage19Laps= 7
Stage20Laps= 7
Stage21Laps= 7

 

7. On the site it says it will take about 90 minutes to test an entire team. Why is it that it takes so long?

How is it that you've set up the test? Are you only doing a couple players at a time? We're looking at running this as part of our initial testing trials with a large number of players trying out and being tested.

I want to know how exactly our increased number of players would affect the time it takes to administer the test. We currently have the players go in two different groups with each player paired up with another one who keeps track of the level achieved and reports to the coaching staff who record the results on a spreadsheet. I just want to make sure this isn't any less efficient than what we currently have in place.

 Duration: the test length depends on the fitness of your team of course. My experience is to make two groups of 15 players, with their warm-up and all that makes up the 90 minutes.

With the software you can devote more attention to the players rather than looking up and down the list on your clipboard and run the test perhaps with more players.

You want to test a large group, perhaps it is a good idea to have somebody focussing on the how the players perform the test and make the beeps. He can call out the name to another person just focussing on the clicking the software buttons.

The paring up is an interesting idea! Never heard of this before. The idea of the software is that no seperate paperwork needs to be done.

8. Can I create my own version of the beeptest? Like the Yoyo test?

With the Team Beep Test software you can script your own specific test. This shows the huge flexibility the software of Bitworks gives you.

Create a txt file with this contents:
========================================
repeat 91 run 2 rest 10

 


LapDistance=20

 

Stage1Laps=2
Stage2Laps=2
Stage3Laps=4
Stage4Laps=6
Stage5Laps=8
Stage6Laps=16
Stage7Laps=16
Stage8Laps=16
Stage9Laps=16
Stage10Laps=16
Stage11Laps=16
Stage12Laps=16
Stage13Laps=16
Stage14Laps=16
Stage15Laps=16

 


Stage1Speed=10
Stage2Speed=11.5
Stage3Speed=13
Stage4Speed=13.5
Stage5Speed=14
Stage6Speed=14.5
Stage7Speed=15
Stage8Speed=15.5
Stage9Speed=16
Stage10Speed=16.5
Stage11Speed=17
Stage12Speed=17.5
Stage13Speed=18
Stage14Speed=18.5
Stage15Speed=19
====================================

More information on the YoYo test on this page:

http://www.rugbycoach.com/fitness/test/yoyotest.htm

9. Differences in shuttle run / beep test timings!

A while ago I entered a beep test run and managed 13.2. Another beep test in the UK gave about the same result. I then used an iphone application for a third test and managed 15.2 with no additional training. This prompted me to check the timings.

I searched the web and found only a handful of sites with beep test timings. Bewilderingly, not one of the sites agreed with the timings of another!!! I tried contacting various sport authorities around the world and nobody could tell me, for absolute certain, what the official timings were. To cut a long story short I managed to get in contact with Luc Leger who is the creator of the beep test. He explained that his original version started at 8.5 km/hr and increased by 0.5 km/hr for each level thereafter. He also told me that a similar version had been made in another country which started at 8.0 km/hr but immediately increased to 9.0 km/hr for level 2 and then by 0.5 km/hr for each level thereafter. As far as VO2 max goes there is no difference in results between the two tests so either can be used.

I ordered the multi-stage fitness CD from the National Coaching Foundation (NCF) in the UK and recorded the timings. The NCF use the altered timings – starting speed of 8.0, and then 9.0 for level 2. It seems to me that somewhere along the line someone took the starting speed of 8.0 and assumed that the speed increases by 0.5 per level after that… which would give completely different results… hence me getting to level 15.2.

The attached spreadsheet shows you a) the timings of the NCF CD, b) the timings of the official original beep test by Luc Leger, and c) the copy of the table that Luc Leger sent to me.
I’ve also attached the PDF that Luc Leger emailed me which makes interesting reading.

I have updated Wikipedia (which was also incorrect) but I don’t know how long it will stay. Luc Leger told me that he updated the site himself a few times with bits of information and within days someone had changed it back!!

My hope now is that everyone can update their sites and apps so that we are all using the same timings and therefore make the beep test an accurate benchmark for fitness assessment that it was designed for.

Thanks.
Dan Ford.

Both the pdf document and the mentioned spreadsheet are in the Free Downloads section.

 

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 16:42

This is a state-of-the-art test designed to measure the anaerobic capacity by using a bicycle ergo meter. I have not tried it myself but this is some info Don de Winter gave me.

For more information on both the test and the theoretical background of the test you might be interested in the work of Bar Or. He co-wrote this book:

 

The book is written by the test's developers, The Wingate Anaerobic Test explains the methodological considerations, typical findings, and various applications of the test. Plus, it eliminates the confusion over how to apply the test accurately and consistently.

The "Wingate Anaerobic Test" includes an introduction to the test and perspective on how it compares with other tests of anaerobic power:

  • descriptions of the proper protocol, necessary equipment, obtainable measures, standardization process, and safety considerations during and after the test;
  • summaries of research on the reliability, validity, and sensitivity of the test;
  • discussions of factors to control or consider while performing the test;
  • typical values of performance found with various groups of subjects;
  • suggestions for future research in anaerobic testing.

The appendix includes data collected at the Wingate Institute over many years, presenting typical values for healthy, untrained Israeli males and females aged 8 to 45 years.

Review

"This book will provide the practitioner with a concise source for protocol and norms. I found the book to be well written and organized. This test is well described in the scientific literature, but norms on the various age groups characterized within this book make it an invaluable source. Our laboratory employs this test in the evaluation of many subjects in a variety of age groups. We will now be capable of providing valid comparisons for the individual to the population at large."
Gregory L. Dykstra, University of Illinois, PhD Candidate, Research Assistant

Target Audiences

Reference for exercise physiologists, physical therapists, physical educators, sports medicine
specialists, physicians, athletic trainers, and fitness instructors.

   

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 16:44

The Yo-Yo determines the maximum aerobic endurance of a player. The test is derived from the Shuttle Run Test.

With this test the participants run back and forth across the gym or training pitch between two lines/markers set twenty meters apart until the players fails to reach the mark at the 'beep' on three consecutive laps or shuttles. After each inidvidual shuttle the players has an active recovery period of 10 seconds. For this, the player jogs up-and-down two cones set 5 meters apart.
The test is usually performed indoor and the speed of the participants is determined by the interval between the audio beeps played on a CD player, cassette or laptop.

Background information on the YoYo test

The starting speed is 10 km/h and each minute the speed is increased by decreasing the interval between the beeps, see the table below for ‘beep’ interval times for each one minute stage.

Yo-yo intermittent Recovery Test protocol 1

 

Stage

Speed
(km/h)

Shuttle
bouts
(2x20m)

Split
distance

Accumulated
distance

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
10,0
12,0
13,0
13,5
14,0
14,5
15,0
15,5
16,0
16,5
17,0
17,5
18,0
18,5
19,0
1
1
2
3
4
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
40
40
80
120
160
320
320
320
320
320
320
320
320
320
320
40
80
160
280
440
760
1080
1400
1720
2040
2360
2680
3000
3320
3640

Players should pivot on the line at the moment of the beep (not quicker or slower). The test result is expressed in stages, you can score between 1/2 or 1 stage.

Yo-yo intermittent Recovery Test protocol 2

 

Stage

Speed
(km/h)

Shuttle
bouts
(2x20m)

Split
distance

Accumulated
distance

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
11,5
12,0
12,5
13,0
13,5
14,0
14,5
15,0
15,5
16,0
16,5
17,0
17,5
18,0
10
11
11
11
12
12
13
13
13
14
14
15
15
15
200
220
220
220
240
240
260
260
260
280
280
300
300
320
200
420
640
860
1100
1340
1600
1860
2120
2400
2680
2980
3280
3600

 

Practicalities

Timing is critical so it is important for the CD/MP3 or older audio cassette plays at the correct speed. We have found that CD players can be affected by pitch controls (set these at neural or off), MP3 playback speed can be affected by mismatch on CODEC sample rates.

Check the playback with the 1 min. test period at the start of the tape. If not possible to adjust for errors in playback speed you will have to work with the shuttle length using this table:

Background information

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 16:44

Thanks to Rich Britten

Introduction

The Australian Rugby Union (A.R.U.) set up a test protocol with specific rugby related elements like running, getting-up, pick-up a ball and driving. This is both the advantage of this test: players can relate to it and enjoy it more and the disadvantage: in order to improve the time the execution of the skills becomes sloppy.

On the other hand it is cheap and simple. You decide....

The fitness test

  1. Divide the team into 2 groups, ideally match for body mass.
  2. Have the paired players face each other 15-20 metres apart, with either a ball, or a shoe at the mid-point.
  3. The drill consists of 3 component: pick and drive, pick and press, sprint. The coach calls out the drills in the sequence listed below, work across the table row by row (horizontally)

Adjust how far down you go depending on the stage of season and general fitness of players. The players have to complete each drill during the allotted time (seconds).

DriveDrivePick & PressPick & PressSprintSprint
25s - 25s - 45s -
20s - 20s - 40s 40s
20s 15s 15s - 35s -
15s 10s 15s 10s 30s 30s
10s - 10s - 30s -
10s 10s 10s - 25s -

More in detail:

  • Drive: player sprints to the ball and picks it up and then drives into contact with his partner, driving him at least 5 metres.
  • Pick/Press: player sprints to the balls, picks it up and runs to side of partner, places the ball, does one push up then sprints back, placing the ball down at mid-point.
  • Sprint: I use approximately a 120 metre sprint, you can use the field width X2.
  • Once the first half has finished change over and have the other players of the pair do the drills.

All within the given times. The drill gets progressively harder as lactic acid builds up, and the double sprints kill the players psychologically as well as physically. (You can be sneaky and adjust the separation distance as the season progresses as well)

Emphasis team unity, have "tackle dummies" encourage partner, and also any player struggling.

Seriously any club that has the money should consider buying the CD- I believe it's on the ARU web-site for about $40 Australian dollars, which I think is about $20 USD.

   

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