Detail Starting Situation

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:53

In General

When you want to create a high performance team you need to look at the team assets and individual strengths of players. Piecing together the optimum position for the players is one of the great teambuilding activities of the coach and his players.

I think a lot of coaches underestimate the motivational power that will develop when you start working with the players and discussing where their competences will benefit the team the most.

With these players specific pages I hope to identify the main tasks that come along with the position. A great teambuilding activity would be to let the team match their individual skills with the positions.

Definition is one, to agree with these tasks is important, performing the tasks is the third thing. Doing all three with all the players in the team is an elementary step to a successful team !

Good luck in developing your team spirit!

Scrum Half (Number 9)

(Also known as Inside Half and Half Back)

This player has to be an all-rounder, an excellent passer off both hands, an effective kicker with both feet, a good defender around the fringes and in cover, and a nimble elusive runner who can sniff a gap and 'snipe' from both set and broken play: lateral movement, explosive steps, agility. Look at my SAQ pages to improve your running technique.

Passing

The scrum half is the one who has the ball the most of all players ! Make sure you put your best overall player here.

Speed and accuracy of passing is more important than length. Many scrum halves slow their backline down (less time and space) by winding up to throw long passes: no back-swing.

Avoid reaching away for the ball, this will cause imbalance and a difficult swing. Try to get above the ball, or take a step back after the pick-up.

Adapt the type of pass to the situation: dive - pop - spin.

Offence

The main task of the scrum half is the distribution of the ball between his forwards and his backs. Like the Fly half he should have vision to put his backrow or backline to work. A scrum half who can make breaks, on the blind side or past the ruck or maul is a potent weapon because it forces the opposition to focus on several areas of defense, both physically and mentally.

The scrum half is also the coach of the forwards in organizing their body positions in mauls and rucks. Demand they clear the ball for you, either drive over or pop it.

Kicking

Yes, the scrum half should also be able to kick the ball when his fly half (the principal kicker of the team) is under pressure. Kick behind line-outs and scrums ("in the box").

Rhythm: Step - Step - Kick: you do not have much more time, so you need to be able to kick facing many different directions.

Defense

The scrum half needs to have a good tactical perspective on defensive lines to play an important role. Most of the time he is the second or third line of defense.

Key issues for the scrum half

  • Quick accurate passing
  • Speed of the mark
  • Kick with either foot
  • Tackle
  • Communication
  • Pace

My favorite scrum-half of the RWC 2011

Australia's Will Genia. Great classic skillset + vision + ability to create a lot of confusion for the defense.

General issues

More on the functional role idea:

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:52

Note: this page is based on IRB coaching material, my own experiences and feedback from other coaches.

In General

When you want to create a high performance rugby team you need to look at the team assets and individual strengths of players. Piecing together the optimum position for the players is one of the great teambuilding activities of the coach and his players.

I think a lot of rugby coaches underestimate the motivational power that will develop when you start working with the players and discussing where their competence's will benefit the team the most.

With these rugby players specific pages I hope to identify the main tasks that come along with the position. A great teambuilding activity would be to let the team match their individual skills with the positions.

Definition is one, to agree with these tasks is important, performing the tasks is the third thing. Doing all three with all the players in the team is an elementary step to a successful team !

Good luck in developing your team spirit!

General issues on the Back Row players

The Back Row Players are also called Loose Forwards or Third Row Players. The three positions have special requirements, but also some in common like speed, mobility, ball skills, accuracy, aggression on attack and defence and they must blend together as a 'unit'. The backrow is the oil in the team, making everything work. Why are teams not "working", they miss the Loose Forwards - look at successful teams and their Loosies.....

At least one of the three must have 'height' for line out possession at the rear.

Every rugby player should develop his speed, for the center extra focus should be on the quick burst through the gap: lateral movement, explosive steps, agility. Look at my SAQ pages to improve your running technique.

Open Side Flanker

I have a small book titled "Bluff Your Way into Rugby". A chapter in the book describes all the different positions so you can convince others that you have played one. The description of the open side is: "Psychotic tackler". A dramatic view but right....

Line-out

Back row players are line-out jumpers too. Develop your ability to catch with either left or right hand or both. Get organized with codes, different moves and practice. Your job is to secure the throw and give the team and attacking opportunity.

You have an important role defending rom the line-out: as soon as the jumper/catcher passes the ball to his Scrum-Half you are on the way to the inside shoulder of the opposition Fly-Half. You leave a big gap for the opposition Scrum-Half of course, but this is not your worry. Communicatie the run-up and the subsequent drift with your ow Fly-Half.

Scrum

Again a whole list of things to do for the back row:

  • Bind correctly, discuss this with your prop.
  • Channel the ball
  • Watch the ball when it moves through the scrum
  • Protect the Scrum Half
  • Explode of the scrum when the ball is out.

Work on the back row moves.

I have a special page on the scrum.

Open play: offence

The Open Side Flanker should comfortable with the ball in hand when first in support of the ball carrier. His decision making skills are key: pick&go, pop pass, go over and protect the ball, wipe opposition player from the breakdown, ... He must 'read' the opposition backline, communicate with his own backline and be accurate in lines of running.

All the skills of the other two back row players but must have the ability both to go to ground to control the ball and to stay on his feet to continue the attack. Work with the other loosies and knowing what the backs are doing to get the right lines to get to the breakdown.

Support the ball carrier and carry on the attack. Do whatever it takes to win the ball!

Defense

The Open Side Flanker has the ability to stop short/blind side attacks with deadly accurate and intimidating tackling. Speed is important for this role but accuracy in lines of running and physical presence in defense is essential.

Fearless, quick, accurate with a range of tackles.

Key issues

  • Aggression, go forward and a strong "will to succeed".

My favorite open side of all times

Richie McCaw, was at Eden Park when he reached the 100 mark, emotional stuff!

General issues

More on the functional role idea:

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:52

Note: this page is based on IRB coaching material, my own experiences and feedback from other coaches.

In General

When you want to create a high performance rugby team you need to look at the team assets and individual strengths of players. Piecing together the optimum position for the players is one of the great teambuilding activities of the coach and his players.

I think a lot of rugby coaches underestimate the motivational power that will develop when you start working with the players and discussing where their competence's will benefit the team the most.

With these rugby players specific pages I hope to identify the main tasks that come along with the position. A great teambuilding activity would be to let the team match their individual skills with the positions.

Definition is one, to agree with these tasks is important, performing the tasks is the third thing. Doing all three with all the players in the team is an elementary step to a successful team !

Good luck in developing your team spirit!

General issues on the Back Row players

The Back Row Players are also called Loose Forwards or Third Row Players. The three back row positions have special requirements, but also some in common like speed, mobility, ball skills, accuracy, aggression on attack and defence and they must blend together as a 'unit'. At least one of the three must have 'height' for line out possession at the rear.

The backrow is the oil in the team: be there at the right time to keep the momentum of attack going (keeping the team in ball possession, pick up and run, pick and pass or chip). Do the dirty work in defence. The back-row should focus on the quick burst through the gap: lateral movement, explosive steps, agility., or hitting the defensive line at speed. Look at my SAQ pages to improve your running technique.

Most people will hardly recognise the value of a good No. 8 player untill in the game he is not there.....

Scrum

Number Eight is a powerful scrummager and a strong runner who can surge off the back of the scrum and break the line of defence. A whole list of things:

  • Channel the ball
  • Protect the ball for the Scrum Half
  • Efficient control of the ball at the base of the scrum by hand or foot
  • Clear the ball: pick and break away to the right looking to link with Fly Half or Scrum Half on the outside or Flanker on inside.
  • Clear the ball: pick and break left combining with the Blind Side Flanker
  • Dynamic running with aggression to get over the gain line and skills to 'distribute' the ball.

I have a special page on the scrum.

Open play: offence

The Open Side Flanker should comfortable with the ball in hand when first in support of the ball carrier. His decision making skills are key: pick&go, pop pass, go over and protect the ball, wipe opposition player from the breakdown, ... He must 'read' the opposition backline, communicate with his own backline and be accurate in lines of running.

All the skills of the other two back row players but must have the ability both to go to ground to control the ball and to stay on his feet to continue the attack. Work with the other loosies and knowing what the backs are doing to get the right lines to get to the breakdown.

Support the ball carrier and carry on the attack. Do whatever it takes to win the ball!

Defense

Number Eight is an efficient defender, speed to get back and cover as well as confidence in relieving pressure from backs by taking the 'highball'.

Stop the drive from a opposition backrow move, tackle low to prevent the ball carrier to set up a maul. The back-row players should discuss the responsiblities in tackling opposite numbers: example:

  • #6 takes ball-carrier
  • #8 takes second ball carrier
  • #9 takes third ball carrier
  • Running lines from scrum or line-out into open play is difficult but the No. 8 should provide a cover in depth or just join the tacklers / markers next to the ruck/maul.

Key issues

  • Aggression, go forward and a strong "will to succeed".

My favorite number eight of the RWC 2011

On player, easy choice: Imanol Harinordoquy. The complete package.

General issues

More on the functional role idea:

   

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:52

Note: this page is based on IRB coaching material, my own experiences and feedback from other coaches.

In General

When you want to create a high performance rugby team you need to look at the team assets and individual strengths of players. Piecing together the optimum position for the players is one of the great teambuilding activities of the coach and his players.

I think a lot of rugby coaches underestimate the motivational power that will develop when you start working with the players and discussing where their competence's will benefit the team the most.

With these rugby players specific pages I hope to identify the main tasks that come along with the position. A great teambuilding activity would be to let the team match their individual skills with the positions.

Definition is one, to agree with these tasks is important, performing the tasks is the third thing. Doing all three with all the players in the team is an elementary step to a successful team !

Good luck in developing your team spirit!

General issues on the Back Row players

The Back Row Players are also called Loose Forwards or Third Row Players. The three positions have special requirements, but also some in common like speed, mobility, ball skills, accuracy, aggression on attack and defence and they must blend together as a 'unit'. The backrow is the oil in the team, making everything work. Why are teams not "working", they miss the Loose Forwards - look at successful teams and their Loosies.....

At least one of the three must have 'height' for line out possession at the rear.

Every rugby player should develop his speed, for the back rowextra focus should be on the quick burst through the gap: lateral movement, explosive steps, agility. Bt also hit the defensive line, trying to break through tackles, looking for the offload. Look at my SAQ pages to improve your running technique.

Line-out

Back row players are line-out jumpers too. Develop your ability to catch with either left or right hand or both. Get organised with codes, different moves and practise. Your job is to secure the throw and give the team and attacking opportunity.

Scrum

Again a whole list of things:

  • Bind correctly, discuss this with your prop.
  • Channel the ball
  • Watch the ball when it moves through the scrum
  • Protect the Scrum Half
  • Explode of the scrum when the ball is out.

Work on the back row moves, defend the blind side.

I have a special page set up for the scrum.

Open play: offence

Because he will arrive later at breakdowns from scrums his decision what to do is very important. His action makes or breaks the continuation of the attack. He needs the ability to 'read the game' in order to anticipate what is going to happen next and be at the right place at the right time. Work with the other loosies and knowing what the backs are doing to get the right lines to get to the breakdown.

Comfortable with the ball in hand when first in support of the ball carrier especially blind side attacks.

On occasions, the experience of playing in the second row helps in appreciating the tight loose requirements of the position.

Defense

An ability to stop short/blind side attacks with deadly accurate and intimidating tackling. Speed is important for this role but accuracy in lines of running and physical presence in defence is essential.

Key issues

  • Aggression, go forward and a strong "will to succeed".

My favorite blind side of the RWC 2011

Too many options really, the French Thierry Dusatoir is my current favourite.

General issues

More on the functional role idea:

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 January 2014 19:52

Note: this page is based on IRB coaching material, my own experiences and feedback from other coaches.

In General

When you want to create a high performance rugby team you need to look at the team assets and individual strengths of players. Piecing together the optimum position for the players is one of the great teambuilding activities of the coach and his players.

I think a lot of rugby coaches underestimate the motivational power that will develop when you start working with the players and discussing where their competence's will benefit the team the most.

With these rugby players specific pages I hope to identify the main tasks that come along with the position. A great teambuilding activity would be to let the team match their individual skills with the positions.

Definition is one, to agree with these tasks is important, performing the tasks is the third thing. Doing all three with all the players in the team is an elementary step to a successful team !

Good luck in developing your team spirit!

General issues on the Second Row players

2nd row players need the size and genuine jumping ability to dominate, and not just compete in the line outs. Strength is required to power the props into the scrum and mobile to get quickly around the pitch.

Some are large and less mobile others are slimmer and more mobile with 'spring' to dominate the middle.

Every rugby player should develop his speed, for the second rowextra focus should be on the quick burst breaking through the defensive line: explosive steps, power and resistance runningagility. Look at my SAQ pages to improve your running technique.

Line-out

Develop your ability to catch with either left or right hand or both. Get organised with codes, different moves and practise. Your job is to secure the throw and give the team and attacking opportunity.

Scrum

Bind on the other lock around the body on the top of the shorts making it tight. Kneel on one knee and bind on your prop. On the "Crouch/engage" hit your prop in the opposition scrum.
This hit is very important, the whole front five should engage as one tight unit not as five individuals. Organise the scrum calls regarding pushing and wheeling.

I have set up a special page regarding the scrum.

Open play: offence

Primary task is securing the lunate ball and being the power-house in the scrum.

You will probably arrive later when an backrow move or a back play has been broken down. While you arrive you should make the right decision:

  • Drive: weight and bulk (as well as body position) should be maximised to drive through the opposition, and over the ball
  • Wheel if momentum is slowed
  • 'Decking' the ball to create a ruck for clean ball for the backs.
  • Or pick-up and go.

Defense

A good defender around the fringes and in cover, making the big hits.

Key issues

  • Aggression, go forward and a strong "will to succeed".

My favorite second row of the RWC 2011

Martin Johnson for his inspirational side or Ian Jones of NZ, for making the 2nd row position more than the big forward player........ My RWC 2011 favourites are Brad THorn and Sam Whitelock.

General issues

More on the functional role idea:

   

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